Prime Day Phishing Examples

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Yesterday, I posted a warning about scams associated with Amazon‘s upcoming Prime Day on July 11th.  Here are a few examples, to help you remain alert and avoid getting caught by the hackers trying to exploit this popular online shopping day.

AmazonPhish1

AmazonPhish2.jpg

AmazonPhish3

In each of these examples, you will notice the following:

  1. The sender address may look like it’s coming from Amazon, but if you take the time to look at the actual address within the <> symbols, you can clearly see that it’s not.  Some email programs will show you this like in these examples.  Others, you may have to hover your mouse over the “from” name to see what the underlying address is.
  2. The message contains only links.  DON’T CLICK.  These links will bring you to malicious sites that will load malware on your device.
  3. The messages all have an Unsubscribe link at the bottom.  As with #2, DON’T CLICK.

Hopefully these examples and warnings will help you enjoy Prime Day safely!

In case you missed my original post yesterday, about this, here is the link.

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